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Paul Smith
07.05.12 | No Comments
Category: Uncategorized
"Optimism" was Paul Smith's word for Spring. "Tough world, so optimism shows through," he said after the presentation. He was in jolly spirits for a man who'd scored his entire show, front to back, to the sounds of New Order.

But for Sir Paul, good business is good humor, and he reports that his suits are going gangbusters. That may be part of the reason he focused so strongly on them in this vivid, colorful show. This season, the suits come sharper and more tailored, with more defined shoulders and more cinched-in waists in the jackets, and cuffed cigarette trousers below.

Two prints—a sliced-and-diced rose, and a graphic print formed of the scissors that did the slicing—looked fine but a bit beside the point. They paled, very literally, before the barrage of dusty-colored suits that closed the show. With their slight sixties swing, they gave the models the look of a rainbow-as-rock-band. Crank it up. Season after season, Smith reminds us that he still does. This time around, he seemed readier than usual to be writ large—that is to say, played loud.
—Matthew Schneier
Lanvin
07.05.12 | No Comments
Category: Uncategorized
Lanvin's men's show today marked a first for the label: the first time the clothes had been shown on an elevated catwalk, because, said Alber Elbaz, "It's time to elevate fashion." But Lanvin has always made time for that, which was clearer in this collection than ever before. From beginning to end, it had a relentless drive, defined by the tension between fashionable opposites: classic versus high-tech, linear versus rounded, detail versus no detail. And, although the presentation was staged with boyish models who were manorexic to the point of parental concern, the collection itself was actually infused with a more generous spirit than has ever been manifest in Lanvin menswear.

That was partly a function of the collection's roundness, with full, high-waisted, pleated trousers and tops whose shoulders drooped fetchingly. But those pieces were all in black and white, as atonal as the Soft Cell track "Memorabilia" that played on the soundtrack. In fact, you had to apply the beady eye to find color, usually a Lanvin strong point (find it you could, in the slim layer of Lanvin blue that shaded shoe soles). In its place there was shine, one of Spring 2013's big stories. There has always been an undercurrent of the shadowy side of glam rock in Lanvin's menswear, and here it was gloriously expressed in a silver-glazed peacoat. That contrast between tradition and tech was extended into pieces that combined reptile and nylon in a shiny union of the snake.

It was such a graphic face-off that you could almost picture the collection's evolution from urban monochrome to futuristic metal as a journey from city streets to moon and stars. That narrative made this the most convincing men's collection Lucas Ossendrijver has created for Lanvin. It was also a testament to the label's enduringly strange romance.
—Tim Blanks
Hermès
07.05.12 | No Comments
Category: Uncategorized
Véronique Nichanian is a weather vane. Her shows are a way to track menswear trends from the margins to the mainstream—by which, we mean the men who have money to spend but don't want to scare the horses with what they buy. Except, those men have clearly spread their wings. The collection Nichanian showed for Hermès today had a subtle edge, grounded in tech fabrics, and a slim, young feel that mirrored the general appetite for fresh flesh that the season has paraded. Canvas was the foundation fabric, but technical treatments meant it could look smooth and synthetic in a coat or as light and crumpled as linen in a jacket.

Speaking of canvas, Nichanian injected a subtle sailing subtext (perhaps as mindful of next year's America's Cup as Kim Jones was at Louis Vuitton the other day) with windbreakers, parkas, and a raincoat in "spinnaker canvas." And she picked up on the season's athletic undercurrent with baseball shirts, a suede-front sweatshirt, and T-shirts cut from the most luxurious materials in the company repertoire (chiffon crocodile, anyone?). Not quite throwaway, but this is as casual as croc is ever going to get. Conspicuously absent, however: the overload of shorts we've been seeing almost everywhere else.

Her use of color, on the other hand, was right in line. She either popped some hot shades, like an acidic absinthe green, citron, and pimento red, or she ran one cool tone top to toe. Examples of that were the Prussian blue suit and matching coat that opened the show or the midnight blue tux that closed it, with a poplin shirt in matching indigo. That utterly effortless-looking luxury is Nichanian's own contribution to the current fashion conversation.
—Tim Blanks
Ami
07.05.12 | No Comments
Category: Uncategorized
"I'm a happy designer," said Ami's Alexandre Mattiussi, as if his titular offer of friendship weren't tip-off enough. Now in its fourth season, Ami has hewed to its own given mandate of uncomplicated clothes for the designer and his friends, model-agency versions of whom gathered in a lovely garden to both celebrate and demonstrate his new collection. The barbecue had been fired up and the band had been cued. As editors and friends swirled around, it became a little tricky to tell who was modeling and who was merely attending. (Neck tattoos proved a reliable indicator.) In a line of echt reasonableness like Ami, where there's very little styling flourish or volume play to distinguish runway from reality, the line is blurred. "I can't disconnect from my life," Mattiussi shrugged, pointing out favorite pieces, like thin linen Prince of Wales suiting peeking out from under a cotton trench, or the unfussy outerwear in dusty, Cannery Row colors. A new print of the birds of France—wagtail, waxwing, kingfisher, and more—appeared on chinos and blown up onto T-shirts.

It's hard to fault Mattiussi for his close tether to reality. His ambitions, unlike those of his fellow designers, push the boundaries in terms of reach rather than concept. To that end, he confided, he's close to signing a lease on a Paris store, hopefully to open this year. Further than that, who knows? You wouldn't be surprised to see him adapt his process to womenswear, for instance. The ideas practically suggest themselves. A new print, perhaps—the bees to the boys' birds?
—Matthew Schneier
Valentino
07.05.12 | No Comments
Category: Uncategorized
Look at Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccioli, so ascetic and spare with their dark clothes and modest demeanor, and you can only wonder at the intensity of the clothes they create. So, obviously, did the scribe who penned their show notes, as lost in the search for words to define the collection as everyone else was after the fact. That's because Chiuri and Piccioli are like the solitary writer who spins a magic kingdom out of his imagination. "Regal beauty," Piccioli said by way of explanation. "Sensual but severe." And if that had a Game of Thrones tang, well, that fitted with a Couture collection that felt like a world we were allowed to enter without fully understanding what it was we were seeing.

The mood board in their studio was dense with nineteenth century altered states: the symbolists, the decadents, a romantic spirit that combined ecstatic release and exhausted lassitude. Valentino is a house that traditionally reads red, but Chiuri and Piccioli dialed down to blue, introspection and reflection versus the extrovert essence of house habit. It made for a quietly spectacular opening in crepes, chiffons, and cashmeres with a lush sobriety. That same idea of modest luxury carried over into a full-length lace and chiffon floral dress, and a coat that was encrusted with cashmere appliqués of flowers and leaves in a pattern that was inspired by William Morris' Tree of Life. It was so ludicrously vivid that you could imagine the old boy himself would have felt one step closer to God when he looked at it.

If there have been times in Chiuri and Piccioli's tenure at Valentino when they seemed a little stultified by respectful politeness, today felt like a once-and-for-all cutting loose. The way they introduced brocade, for instance, an oldish idea, but here zapped with yellow. Then there was the blue, of course, antithesis of all the house traditionally holds dear, even if the red did reinsert itself toward the end of the show (which only created a pleasurable tension for Spring). One of the most memorable outfits from this Couture moment in Paris will surely be the evening dress in navy plissé with the black shadow falling diagonally across it. Stark lushness—why does that notion sound so right with Couture in such transition?
—Tim Blanks
Maison Martin Margiela
07.05.12 | No Comments
Category: Uncategorized
Raf Simons' presence in the front row at Maison Martin Margiela's first couture week runway show caused a stir. One editor wondered aloud if it meant that the mystery man himself, a friend of Simons', had returned to the label that bears his name. That's not likely, but this 15-look "Artisanal" collection, as the house calls it, was founded on one of Margiela's signature fixations: reclaiming vintage clothes, accessories, and other objects (remember his household furniture show from Fall 2006?) and reworking them by hand into new pieces.

The raw cotton sleeveless jacket that opened the show was modeled after a 1905 tailcoat, its closure a crystal doorknob found in New York City. An antique silk gown beaded in an Art Nouveau motif was transformed into a long, quilted bomber jacket. And a bolero and vest constructed from vintage baseball gloves and a coat made from a windsurfing sail added a surreal touch.

The focus was on the upper half of the body. For the lower half, the design team sourced lace from all over France to make simple straight-leg trousers that acted as a canvas for the action above. The models went incognito behind masks (another old Margiela trope) embroidered with hundreds of crystals. There was no shortage of beads or lace either, but nonetheless the presentation acted as an avant-garde (and eco-friendlier) antidote to the shows that preceded it this week. A welcome addition to the couture schedule.
—Nicole Phelps
Jean Paul Gaultier
07.05.12 | No Comments
Category: Uncategorized
There's little doubt that posterity will recognize Jean Paul Gaultier as one of the all-time greats, but it will also have to recognize the profligacy of his genius, the carelessness with mere bagatelles like timekeeping (the 90-minute wait today bordered on those interminable delays that were a signature of the house 20 years ago), the way the extravagantly throwaway has always shared catwalk space with fiercely disciplined, beautifully crafted clothes. Haute couture has indulged both those impulses to an extreme for the designer, so the pendulum swing of consensus on his couture is unsurprisingly determined by which impulse dominates. Today, mercifully, it was discipline and craft.

That's probably what happens when you have a presiding spirit as wayward as Pete Doherty, the voice on the soundtrack, the star of Sylvie Verheyde's adaptation of nineteenth century poet Alfred de Musset's Confession of a Child of the Century, which was the spark of the collection. Once you'd ascertained (thank you, Wiki!) that de Musset's grand amour was the novelist George Sand, who scandalized mid-nineteenth century Paris by wearing men's clothes and smoking in public, Gaultier's collection slotted with the greatest of ease into his series of salutes to everything that has ever made Paris so justifiably full of itself. Erin O'Connor opened the show as Sand, in top hat, tailcoat, and gentleman's fob. She was followed by a set of Gaultier's peerless meditations on Le Smoking, including a silhouette that quoted Dior's Bar silhouette. It was never a secret that Gaultier would have been a logical candidate for the top job at Dior when Galliano got the gig. This season, when Dior is once again the big story with the Simons ascendancy, there was a certain poignancy in such reminders of that long-ago dream.

But Gaultier went on to prove how he owns his decadent, romantic, polymorphous fashion sensibility. Sand's tailcoat came back time and again, in crocodile, in camel, in the "male couture" that Gaultier inserted with a wincing lack of subtlety, and in the bridal finale, where the tails were splayed across a white skirt in front while the lapels were extended into swan's wings in back. The designer also paraded silken kimono-styled eveningwear that conveyed the fin de siècle feel of outfits named after characters from Proust, Huysmans, and Wilde. The colors—absinthe, coral, gold, papal purple—were the colors of opium dreams. Gaultier amplified the Beaux Arts mood by including a couple of articulated automatons. They could have been the robot from Metropolis. Or maybe they were sisters of the Georges Méliès creation that featured in Martin Scorsese's Hugo. Better that way—Gaultier's collections are always a love song to Paris.
—Tim Blanks
Anne Valérie Hash
07.05.12 | No Comments
Category: Uncategorized
Soft tailoring is Anne Valérie Hash's main gig. Comfy isn't a word that gets used much in fashion, but maybe it should. It's the reason why shoppers respond to her jackets that slouch on like a sweater and crossover waistline pants. Practicality isn't a quality that gets cheered much, either, but Hash embraces it, whipping up blazers in a Japanese technical cotton that are completely reversible. She's even got a "dress in a bag" in her new pre-collection. Take it off and you can stuff the whole thing into one of its gathered sleeves. If that cobalt jersey number was more marketing gimmick than anything else, it showcased Hash's gorgeous color sense. The same shade of blue was used as a waistline accent on a great-looking terra-cotta all-in-one. Jumpsuits are doing well for the designer in stores, so she added several new styles to the lineup. There's no reason to think they won't perform just as well.
—Nicole Phelps
Elie Saab
07.05.12 | No Comments
Category: Uncategorized
In Constantinople's Wake was the name Elie Saab gave his show. The Byzantine Empire proved fertile territory for the designer. This was one of his prettiest shows to date, focused, as is his custom at Couture, almost entirely on cocktail dresses and evening gowns, and remarkably light despite the resplendence of all its thousands of beads, sequins, and crystals. It helped that he chose such delicate fabrics—Chantilly lace, silk jacquards that looked gold leafed, and a mosaic-print georgette—and that he used such soft shades of pink and blue. In the past, Saab's colors have appeared dull or muddy. Not here, although a vivid jade felt garish in comparison to the sun-washed pastels.

He opened with a caftan shape in embroidered black tulle. The silhouette looked novel for him, but he mostly stuck to his Oscar-winning formula of red-carpet frocks. His talents don't lie as much in patternmaking (the cuts are quite simple and repetitive) as they do in his way with embellishments: where he insets lace or stitches paillettes, how low a dress dips in back, how high a slit rises on the thigh. A sky blue silk crepe dress with gold guipure lace scrolling down one arm and side was particularly lovely. It'll be a lucky actress who gets to wear it first.
—Nicole Phelps
Ulyana Sergeenko
07.05.12 | No Comments
Category: Uncategorized
Ulyana Sergeenko, the Russian couture collector and street-style star turned designer, put on a runway show smack dab in the middle of Chanel and Armani Privé today, and had the kind of front row that other up-and-coming designers dream about: Carine Roitfeld, Grace Coddington, and a coterie of her own high-spending countrywomen, who gave Sergeenko a standing ovation when she came out for her bow. Her pal Elena Perminova was actually wearing a variation on one of the looks on the catwalk. Not a bad business plan—the Russian crowd is obsessively photographed on the streets outside the shows. Inside the Théâtre Marigny, there was more than a handful of young women wearing what has become Sergeenko's signature look: clingy sweater tucked into a fifties-style full skirt, some extending all the way to the ground.

And there was more of that on the runway, as well as Russianisms like military great coats lined in fur and chintz apron dresses, plus street-style bait like a puff-sleeve turtleneck top and matching bloomers. The accessories—babushkas, hand-carved wooden heels, big fur hats and gloves—put the accent on the designer's heritage. Natalia Vodianova, the Russian supermodel, closed the show in a floor-sweeping black coat and flower-embroidered tulle veil. "Bellissima," Anna Dello Russo crowed backstage afterward. Sergeenko is a storyteller, but if she wants to break through to a wider audience, she'll eventually need to curb the fairy tale.
—Nicole Phelps